PSCORE

WHAT WE DO

At PSCORE, with the help of volunteers, we provide free 1:1 tutoring classes for the refugees. This classes are mostly English classes to help them integrate themselves in South Korean society and to be able to share their stories with more people around the globe. We also provide tutoring depending on their interests in other foreign languages (Chinese, French) or even sciences (mathematics, biology). To help them, we often provide study books for the students as well as some class material when needed.

 

 

WHY DONATE?

Every year, thousands of refugees are escaping from one of the toughest regimes in the modern world: North Korea. For refugees fleeing hunger and persecution in North Korea, getting out of the country is only the first step to a normal life with a chance to realize their dream. For those who succeed in reaching South Korea, the journey is not over. The drastic changes between North Korea and the modern developed country that is South Korea can be overwhelming. 

Testimonials

I could successfully enter college because PSCORE’s style of teaching fits me. When I was challenged with difficult questions, my tutor went through the whole problem solving process, step by step, with me. She gave me some advice of how to study efficiently as well. This encouraged me to study even harder.

Ga-young Lee

North Korean Defector

I am learning art at Hongik University (the art school at Hongik University is ranked top in Korea). I am so busy studying at school so I am not learning anything else. At the school, there are many various fees for art materials, so there are some hardships. Last summer vacation, I wanted to make my own piece of art, but I had to work hard to earn money to buy the art materials for next semester. I worked at a kitchen and served at a barbecue restaurant, because of that, I could not draw. The money I earned, which is used for accommodation near the school and to buy art materials, drained quickly.

Ahn Chung- guk

Artist, Student at Hongik University, Seoul, South Korea

I am thankful that PSCORE provides free tutors to refugees who have difficulties studying. I have been studying in South Korea for four years and there have been several instances that I wanted to kill myself. It was the grades… The report cards that follow midterm exams and final exams have disappointed me very much, and they created in me an adverse reaction to studying. (...) For 2 years I wandered from place to place, unable to adapt to school life. As I was struggling with life, news of PSCORE’s educational support program was very pleasant and exciting to hear. Weekly meetings with my instructor Yoo Jung-mo never end with studying. Although we do study, we also talk about how the previous week went; I share about life in North Korea and ask about life in South Korea. Academics are important to me, but what I needed was a teacher with whom I can talk and who could also help with my studies.

I will study diligently. At times the stress associated with studying tempts me to kill myself, but I will resist. There are so many people who have helped me that ending my own life would be wronging them. (...) Just as I received so much help, I want to become someone who can also give help to others and stand by them in times of their need. I want to thank the PSCORE instructors for not only tutoring me, but also for helping me find a dream and a hope.

Kim

North Korean Defector

It has been a little over 5 months since I settled down in South Korea. At first I stumbled my way to the PSCORE office and “thank you” was the only English phrase I knew. Now, I am proud of my ability to hold a conversation with the blue-eyed foreign English instructors and to be able to give greetings in simple English.

PSCORE’s cultural program and English class was once unfamiliar to me, but these meetings with foreigners and fellow North Korean escapees are now events that I eagerly look forward to.

To the PSCORE staff and volunteer instructors who encouraged our heavy hearts and befriended us, I feel I owe more than an expression of gratitude. I wish to show my appreciation by studying hard and becoming fluent in English quickly.

I hope this effort of good faith will be an adequate response to their kindness.

Oh

North Korean Defector

*All the names are changed for privacy matters

Successful stories

The confidence he needed

Every spring after a long winter break, 12-year-old students go to school holding their parents’ hands in South Korea, with their hearts fluttering with expectations of new friends. And at dawn of one spring day, a 12-year-old boy named Soo-Hwan (assumed), who was living in North Korea, began his dangerous journey to South Korea. Click here to Read More
 

Class president

A North Korean defector student went from being the victim of school bullying to becoming the classroom president. Click here to Read More
 

A dream comes true

One of our student’s biggest dreams was to become a florist. Click here to Read More

Made by Nathanaël Gimenez - all rights reserved to PSCORE - Icons made by Freepik, OCHA and Daniel Bruce at http://www.flaticon.com